enquirer.com

News
Front Page
Local
Sports
-Bengals
-Reds
-Bearcats
-Xavier
Business
Weather
Traffic
Back Issues
AP Wire
-World
-Nation
-Sports
-Business
-Arts
-Health

Classifieds
Jobs
Autos
General
Obits
Homes

Freetime
TV Listings
Movies
Dining
Calendars
Weekend

Opinion
Columns
Borgman

GoCinci
HelpDesk
Feedback
Circulation
Subscribe
Phone #'s
Search

Local News
Place your classified online!

Campaign finance debate includes ads
Union buys irk some lawmakers

Thursday, April 23, 1998

BY PAUL BARTON
Enquirer Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON -- Cincinnati-area members will each have their own objectives for the campaign finance debate now scheduled to resume in the House. Of Tristate members, only Rep. Ted Strickland, D-Lucasville, originally signed a petition to force new debate on the issue.

But Rep. Lee Hamilton, D-Nashville, Ind., changed his mind and added his name to the petition Wednesday.

Mr. Hamilton, who is retiring this year, at first opposed the discharge petition out of respect for the committee process, he said.

"While it is not my practice to sign discharge petitions, I believe so strongly in the need for campaign finance reform that I have decided to make an exception," Mr. Hamilton said.

"There is simply too much money, particularly unregulated and undisclosed money, flowing into federal elections."

A common theme sounded by Cincinnati-area members is the need for stricter disclosure requirements on advertising purchased by labor unions and other interest groups in different television markets that affects races for federal offices, especially Congress. Some area members want to go even further and prevent labor unions from using members' dues money for political purposes without their consent.

"I've heard from a lot of the folks I represent, my constituents, who object to their dues money being used for political purposes," said Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Cincinnati.

Labor unions advertised heavily against Mr. Chabot in his 1996 race.

One of the ideas that Mr. Strickland favors is turning campaign finance reform over to an independent commission similar to the one used for military base closing decisions. Congress would then have to accept or reject its recommendations in total and not dicker over specifics.

Rep. Rob Portman, R-Terrace Park, has long been an advocate of abolishing political action committee funding in federal races. One of Rep. John Boehner's ideas is to strengthen rules prohibiting contributions from noncitizens.

Mr. Boehner, R-West Chester and the fourth-ranking leader in the House, is also calling for more timely and complete disclosure of contributions.



Local Headlines For Thursday, April 23, 1998

An alley cat finds holy rescue squad
Benefit dinner canceled
Butler County gets tough on obscenity
Butler, Warren pack in the tourists
Campaign finance debate includes ads
Campbell officials under fire
Chabot, Qualls chasing dollars
Clock ticking for victims
Day celebrates wonderful world
Democratic groups in D.C. back Lucas
Dramatics help kids lose inhibitions, find creativity
Finan: It's sales tax hike or nothing
Former aide of Voinovich out of jail
Freedom Center to get slavery papers
Friend arrested in fatal stabbing
Gangster jailed on assault charge
Glenn to play lab rat for flight on shuttle
Group raising red flag over school board campaign funds
Judge Nadel won't budge
Lakota student charged in BB gun incident
Man's assault a mystery
No charges pending in fatal accident
Orphan home was victim of abortion war
Owen B. Butler, 74, guided P&G fortunes
School catches computer wave
Schools critical of tinkering
Sewer chief fails to sway commission
Speed-limit error fixed -- speedily
TRISTATE DIGEST
Viagra causing local clamor


 
Ad index | Questions/help | Suggestions | News tips | Letters to the editors
Web advertising | Web access | Place a classified | Subscribe | Circulation

Copyright 1998 The Cincinnati Enquirer, a Gannett Co. Inc. newspaper.
Use of this site signifies agreement to terms of service updated 2/28/98.
Search 47,612 news pages:     Help