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BIG MONEY & POLITICS/WHO GETS HURT?
FEBRUARY 7, 2000 VOL. 155 NO. 5

PAGE 1 | 2 | 3
"How much money can you contribute?"

The stunned lawyer explained that he represented a state agency and that state governments do not contribute to political candidates. As if in response to hearing some programmed words that altered his brain circuitry, the Congressman changed his tone and demeanor instantly. Suddenly, he had more pressing obligations. He would be unable to meet with the lawyer. Rather, he said, an aide would listen to whatever it was the lawyer had to say.

Of course, those who give money to political candidates or their parties don't necessarily get everything they seek. Often the reason is that their opponents are just as well connected. But they do get access--to the Representative or Senator, the White House aide or Executive Branch official--to make their case.

Try it yourself. You won't get it.

Bits and pieces of the story of those who give the money and what they get in return have been told, here and elsewhere. But who gets hurt--the citizens and businesses that do not play the game--remains an untold story.

Over the next nine months, continuing until the presidential election in November, TIME will publish periodic reports examining the anonymous victims of big money and politics. END

PAGE 1 | 2 | 3

COPYRIGHT © 2000 TIME INC.





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Strapped for Cash, the DNC Goes for Broke TIME Notebook: The Dems try to close the money gap with George W.
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TIME ARCHIVES
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WEB RESOURCES
U.S. House of Representatives
Check on how Congress is voting

U.S. Senate
Look in on your senator, and check his or her voting record

Public Campaign
An advocacy group working toward "clean money elections"

Brookings Institute
Campaign finance reform sources